September 14, 2022

Not The Throne You Imagined

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Let us then approach God’s throne of grace with confidence, so that we may receive mercy and find grace to help us in our time of need. Hebrews 4:16 NIV

If you really want one, there’s a business in New York City that will sell you a throne.  You can choose a King David Throne or even a King Kong throne!

Thrones signify power.  God’s throne is described in Scripture as being “high and lifted up” (Isaiah 6:1), surrounded by heavenly hosts (2 Chronicles 18:18) and mentions all other crowns of authority thrown down before it (Revelation 4:9-10). God sits on His throne in judgment in a daunting passage of the 20th chapter of Revelation (20:11-14). But there’s much more than just judgment to God’s throne.

The Bible book of Hebrews presents a very different picture of God’s throne—calling it a throne of grace!  “Let us then approach God’s throne of grace with confidence,” it reads, “so that we may receive mercy and find grace to help us in our time of need” (Hebrews 4:16 NIV). Back in Old Testament days, there was no approaching God’s throne for you and me. A high priest was chosen to represent people in their dealings with God. The priest presented the peoples’ gifts to God and offered sacrifices for their sins. But Jesus changed everything.

“God qualified him,” says Scripture, “as a perfect High Priest, and he became the source of eternal salvation for all those who obey him” (Hebrews 5:9). When Jesus came to earth and became the one-time sacrifice available to everyone, we were given the privilege of making our requests at the throne of grace.

Yes, thrones signify power. But the follower of Jesus is invited to come confidently to the God’s throne of grace where there is there is mercy, and His powerful help in our time of need, given freely.